blog > Posts tagged "death"

Preparing my Funeral by Misha Lyuve

Jun 9, 2012

are-we-ready.jpg

So a few weeks ago I started with this cold. Every day I was hoping that next morning I would feel better, but within a week’s time, it just got worse. And then I’ve been in and out of it. I tried juicing and antibiotics, chicken soup and acupuncture, vitamins and working from home, hot baths and restful weekends. The bug didn’t seem to be leaving. And I thought, maybe, just maybe, it’s my time to go. Ok people, I am not trying to be dramatic here or anything. But the bug was not going away and, I don’t know about you, I have thoughts in my head all the time.   

Also I recently wrote a song that has the following verse: 

But I am not afraid to die
You can take me if you like
All my bags are packed and light
I am ready for the ride 
  

As for any compulsive planner, I don’t think it was that unreasonable for me to start planning my own funeral. So here is the list of rules I came up with:
- please no drama; light crying/sobbing is alright
- dress code: bright and festive; comfortable for dancing and jumping around
- funny memories and jokes are ok 

Then I started to think about logistics. Nowadays one needs to consider environmental impact of his death (in fact, I found an article “8 ecologically friendly alternative to burial “). Then there are inheritance implications. And don’t forget social media unwinding strategy (you gotta read Bury me on Facebook.) The logistics gave me so much headache that I decided that I’m just not ready yet to deal with it, and I might as well keep living.   

By the way, this is how my song ends and I am yet to sing it live:   

And I am not afraid to die
But I don’t think it’s yet my time
So let me play and sing and rhyme
And be afraid and be alive. 
  

Thanks for reading.

Bury Me on Facebook by Misha Lyuve

Sep 17, 2011
In fond memories of Heather Vaughn and Richard Bowen. I am sure they are having a laugh with us


Unlike previous generations, after our death there will remain something beyond life-long accumulated clutter – our Facebook pages. They will be left for historians and biographers to assemble chronology of our life events, explain our ever changing tastes (and haircuts) and interpret motives behind our actions. And maybe more…

Two of my good acquaintances passed in the last two month. Their facebook pages turned into memorials and celebration of their lives, which made me realize: social media has not only conquered our lives, but even deaths now. Amen. However…

Looking at the comments left at these two pages, where memories became alive and pictures precious and gratitude astounding, grieving became more than just a lonely introverted individual experience, but a phenomenon where a community as a whole got a chance to express its love, respect and sadness.

And what I was left with is that underneath the hustle and bustle of our daily routine there is a stream of love. And more importantly, the expression of it is bursting with a desire to get out – it begs a question: why is the opening for that expression waiting for someone to die? Why don’t we rush and be an abundant expression of love, gratitude and admiration to the alive now?

Now a few words of wisdom. Remember those times, when you thought no one loves you, etc, and you imagine your own funeral? – that’s past. Now you can imagine your Facebook page full of lovely teary messages making up for the past lack of comments to your status updates and “likes” of your pictures. Also watch out what you’re posting – the delete function might not work from the other side.

Two deaths in London by Misha Lyuve

Jul 24, 2011
Listen to Amy while reading this post 

 

Lucian Freud and Amy Winehouse are the two names that aren’t likely to show up in the same sentence. But as they both died in London last week, the pair had me think about them together.

As different as they might seem – Freud (the Dr. Freud’s grandson) who shocked the world with his nudes that showed more flesh that most could handle and who lived till 88, and Winehouse whose brief, dense and volatile career and life, and now death at 27, rocked the world – the two seemed to have much more in common than one would think.

"Reflection", by Lucian Freud (self-portrait)

Reflection (self-portrait), by Lucian Freud

Kate Moss'a portrait, by Lucian Freud

Kate Moss's portrait, by Lucian Freud

Naked man with a rat, by Lucian Freud

Naked man with a rat, by Lucian Freud

So what is in common? – Raw, real and honest art. Fraud spent days with his models, in order to get into every detail of their bodies – and by the way, all kinds of bodies: young and old, skinny and fat – and discover details more intimate than a lover could see. I think the only reason why we would want to turn away from his paintings is because behind pretty and shiny pictures in magazines we forgot what real bodies look like.

And Amy wasn’t there to be nice, cute and clean or for someone to like her. Whatever demons that troubled her, with authentic roughness in her voice and from the depth of her chest, she made it very clear – she ain’t going to rehab. Yeh, rehab might’ve saved her life. But I think I get it now, maybe she was worried if there would be Amy left after rehab.

Now everyone is screaming about wasted life and lost talent – what do you know? – look at your own life and talents and see what you are waisting. No reason to judge Amy. Thank you very much